Journal: A Kiwi in London, looking back on ’15

A few months ago, I wrote a blog on London weather. In it I complained that it had proved to be nowhere near as cold as I was told it would be. I had predicted eating my words, that it would get cold, and I had expected this by mid-December. It’s now at the end of December and about to pass into a new year, and yet I’m still not freezing. We had one Saturday that felt especially cold in the middle of November, but largely, the winter months have been underwhelming.

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Perhaps global warming is therefore doing it’s thing. I’ll try not spend the whole of my last blog of 2015 discussing the weather, but perhaps my interest in doing so shows just how the British have rubbed off on me. I’ve been in London six months now, and I feel I’m pretty used to the place now. The gimmick of being in the biggest Great Britain city has now worn off, and what was once unique is now commonplace. I no longer find the underground an interesting experience, instead it is a bore. I still find the European architecture, the mix of Georgian, Victorian and Industrial influences inspiring, although I much less frequently find new interesting places in London to explore. I frequently find myself at Oxford Circus, surrounded by shuffling tourists blocking my path and slowing my down – basically I’m finding complaining a standard part of my day to day behavior. That could only mean the London mind-set has rubbed off on me.

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I’m still happy I’ve moved to London, even though I do find myself missing things back on the other side of the world. I made some good friends living in Auckland, as well as many old friends back in Dunedin, of whom I miss equally, as well as my old job and lifestyle. I tend to get caught up in nostalgia and not appreciate what I’m doing in the present, but at the same time I think it’s good to remember where you’ve came from. I don’t plan to get lost permanently on this side of the world, but at least I can think fondly on having conquered the fear of moving out of my home country. When I move back, which I will inevitably do, I can look back on this experience with a sense of accomplishment.

I can look back on my 2015 adventures with pride. One year ago I was irritating my friends and family, quizzing them as to whether they thought I should move overseas. I had a Glastonbury ticket, but as late as March I was still dithering as to whether or not I would really leave.  For some reason I was able to pull the trigger and I don’t regret it. There’s a lot I’ve had to leave behind, but a lot I’ve gained as well. Experiencing Glastonbury, seeing Greece, Holland, France and Italy are just a few of the unexpected surprises that this year held. Not to mention experiencing being part of the UK workforce, working for major international companies, and making new friends on this side of the world. Back in June I started a series of blogs called, A Season Of Firsts – this tracked my progress making it from New Zealand to United Kingdom in more detail.

It was already an action packed year, even before this whole UK experience. Back in February, I managed to reunite with my high school band, Incarnate. This was also not something I’d ever counted on, given that I moved to a different city as them, and the rest of the members moved onto new projects (although I played with several of the members briefly after Incarnate as Ignite The Helix, a project which is still active). It was great to literally get the band back together, and the strong turnout we received at Dunedin (NZ) venue, Chicks Hotel was gratifying. We filmed this gig from a few angles, and I’m proud of the final result. Incarnate was a particularly memorably part of my music career, and I hope it won’t be the last time we play together (if it is, this gig was a good way to end the short life of our passionate young metal band).

I attended a lot of concerts through-out the year as well. Laneway kicked things off in January with memorable sets from Ariel Pink, Future Islands and Flying Lotus, later I was to see Drake at Vector Arena – and perhaps the most suprisingly entertaining musical event of the first half of the year was Auckland’s second Westfest. This mini-Soundwave for New Zealand featured such metal and rock big names as Soundgarden, Faith No More, Judas Priest and Lamb Of God. The organizers may have sold slightly less tickets than expected (there’s a rumour that losses ran into the millions) but those that attended received a great day of entertainment. Norwegian band Mayhem headlined a smaller stage during Faith No More, and as I had a high school fascination with this band, I was grateful to have the opportunity to see them live. At the after party I ran into Necrobutcher, original bassist of the band, who turned out to be a really cool guy. It’s not often you get to share Vodka with a member of an infamous band and discuss some pretty serious stuff. I wrote a blog on this as well, and I hope the band won’t object to me sharing some of my thoughts on their career. The music continued through-out the year, I wrote about Glastonbury here, and most recently Peaches, who played a great sold at show at Camden’s Electric Ballroom.

I’ve also managed to continue film and music projects throughout the year. In June, I filmed two music videos, one for Ignite The Helix (featuring members of Incarnate) and one for my rap project, Posse In Effect. Posse In Effect’s video for We Came Here To Party, off our second EP Lazarus has been completed and is now out of the public to digest (any views would be much appreciated). This is a slapstick comedy short film, and perhaps more disco/rock than rap. Directed by Andy Weston and myself, it was filmed in Melbourne and shot on a variety of DSLR’s (but mostly the Canon M3) so the footage is a little inconsistent, but I feel the humour was well executed. I also managed to include some footage shot in Athens, within a dream sequence. The video for Ignite The Helix’s Throwing Scissors is nearing completion, but still requires a few re-edits. I hope to have this released in the next few months, upon the release of the song (as the band is still putting the finishing touches on their debut EP).

I’m not sure if this blog will have been interesting to anyone but myself, but looking back on 2015 I realize, I’ve achieved a great deal I’m proud of. London’s not all bad, and though I’m glad I came here, I won’t feel negative to return home soon. I look forward to 2016 and whatever it will bring – and I hope for all of us, it will be as easy a year as any could possibly be. Lets hope the war in Syria ends without too high a casualty rate as well, and that the refugee situation does not get any worse, to get political. I also hope the New Zealand flag doesn’t change. More from me later, for now, 2015 is just another year of “auld lang syne” (good tune, Robbie Burns). 

A Season Of Firsts part V: First day in London and it’s a toilet-less Blur

The ‘A Season Of Firsts’ series of blogs is me accounting my experience of relocating from New Zealand to the United Kingdom to work and travel.

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Unwrapping the bags at Gatwick

On the 20th of June, 7am in the morning, I arrived in London. That’s over a month ago, so any thoughts I’ll be sharing on this iconic city will be from the mindset of the jaded recent arrival, rather than the completely naive and fresh London immigrant.

London has very few public toilets. This was my first major revelation about the place, and one that would strongly taint my initial first impressions of the city. Making my way from Gatwick to a hostel in a suburb I had no idea about, dealing with the underground for the first time, trying to use Google Maps and orientate myself with a 24 KG pack on my back; this was all hard enough. Let alone with a full bladder, and seemingly no way of emptying it. I skipped the toilets at Gatwick assuming I would easily be able to find one on the way. This is one of the largest cities in the world after all. The only one to be found at London Bridge Underground Station required coins, and I didn’t yet have any Great Britain Pounds to my name. There was none to be found at my next stop of Rotherhithe either. This is now a good hour and a half after I boarded the express train from Gatwick into the city. London looked nice, but I’d not yet seen any major landmarks yet, just suburbs of brick houses and a grey-ish sky. It was beginning to seem a particularly anti-climatic entrance to the city, but one that in it’s own way was quintessentially London.

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My introduction to London

I didn’t make it all the way to the Hostel, I had to dive into the first bushy area I could find and illegally relieve myself, making the most of the one of the conveniences of the male gender. Now able to think straight, I soon found my hostel and proceeded to the next mission of getting some Pounds in hand. Turns out withdrawing money from a New Zealand Debit Card was an equally frustrating endeavor, with the ATM in the hostel spitting my card back at me without handing over any paper. Off I went to find the nearest Barclay’s which were apparently fee-less. I got lost, ended up at a small Thameside mall, and gave in to the first ATM I saw. I would soon find out that there was no avoiding bank charges when withdrawing from an overseas account in the UK. So advice for anyone traveling soon; take all the cash with you.

My first day in London was therefore suitable un-restful. That afternoon, on my return to the hostel I would receive a message from a friend. Blur were playing Hyde Park that afternoon, so it was off to that. Being unaware of the time it takes to travel throughout London, and lacking in any sense of direction I gave up on trying to navigate the tubes and instead booked an Uber. Probably the best decision I made my first day in London, as the Uber got me right to Bethnal Green Station early. I met up with my friends and was able to head to Hyde Park together, right on time to see all the support acts. I wasn’t too tired at this stage; I had slept enough on the plane from Dubai to London, but I was completely overwhelmed by having finally made it to the British metropolis I had been anticipating for sometime. Being overwhelmed I was unable to truly appreciate seeing Blur live, or appreciate what it was like to actually be standing in Hyde Park. In fact, it didn’t seem that special. Turns out Hyde Park is just another park, which happened to have a large stage situated upon in, and a lot of people milling around listening to music.

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We’ve made it to a concert

It may not have the wisest idea to go to a large music festival the day of arrival in a completely foreign city twenty four hours from home. But regardless, Blur were amazing, and maybe one day I’ll see them when I’m not confused – and truth be told, slightly drunk. The ciders were flowing, the exchanging of dollars for pounds were taking place, and my slightly hedonistic first Great Britain summer was had begun. How else do you spend your time in London, then spend all your money on music, arts, performances and substances? I should add, before I sound too jaded, that Blur at Hyde Park was a great concert that well lived up to expectations. The set-list was huge, the new songs sounded great side by side with the old classics and they even made time for fan favorites like Stereotypes. But the whole thing was a bit of a.. fog. Too much entertainment, too soon.

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It was all a Blur

It would not be long until I would have a job yet again. Applying for positions before arrival turned out to be a wise option, and within days of touching down I would have my first interview. Finding a flat was not easy, and for someone looking to keep costs to a minimum I soon learned I would have to settle. London is no place for indecision and my problem solving skills were immediately tested. Savings would not last long, and as I sit writing this, I’m wracked with doubt about how I’m going to avoid expensive meals and drinking sessions yet still remain social. Still another month to go until that first paycheck comes.

If you take anything from my experience, it’s to be prepared. For the bank charges and for the lack of toilets. Learn from my mistakes – use the Airport toilet before you hop on the train to the city. London is a hard enough city without having to deal with a bursting bladder and no options to empty it.

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Disregarding the puns – Blur are awesome

A Season Of Firsts part IV: A day in South East Asia – Kuala Lumpur

The ‘A Season Of Firsts’ series of blogs is me accounting my experience of relocating from New Zealand to the United Kingdom to work and travel.

I’m now five days into my travels and two hours from landing in London, writing this entry from my quite comfortable Emirates economy seat – complete with wifi and plus for my laptop. Having slept most of the last flight from KL to Dubai, I continued my sleep quest in order to be as rested as possible by the time the plane lands in Gatwick. It was one of those strange post-REM sleep phases, where dreams are vivid and sleep feels more like indulgent dozing than necessary rest. Never the less, the eight hour trip from Dubai to London flew by and I was quite happy to be awoken by one of the flight attendants for breakfast. Although in my groggy state, I took the word omelet to mean the same thing as a croissant, and not wanting a bread item for breakfast I ordered the Scrambled Eggs instead. The eggs were not bad, but who knows how good that omelet could have been.

Any fears I’ve had regarding air travel have been largely rendered unwarranted, as flying both Royal Brunei and Emirates were fine experiences. Emirates lived up to it’s reputation and was the cushier of the airlines, the multi-region charging plugs and wifi being greatly appreciated. Due to all the sleep I didn’t experience a great deal of in-flight entertainment, but there is a lot to choose from. I briefly watched Blazing Saddles during dinner and a few days ago on Royal Brunei watched the original film adaptation of Anastasia with Ingrid Bergman. A novel experience watching such an old film 10,000 feat in the air, but probably not that entertaining an adaptation.

It’s all been a bit of a gimmick so far, seeing new places and things, such as being able to tell people as I landed in Kuala Lumpur a few days ago that this was my first time out of Australasia (minus the hour stop of in Brunei just previous to that). My short lived and slightly frantic tour of one South East Asia metropolis was fun, but not without it’s hiccups. I was under the assumption that the hotel I’d booked was close to the airport and of a decent quality for the money I was paying. Turns out that close to the airport was still 20 minutes away, and no matter how comfortable the bed was and how polished the interiors looked, the cockroaches that crawled the hallway and my room before sleep would be the lasting impression. I had hoped to get into the city on my one night in Kuala Lumpur, but the hotel was in the opposite direction from the city and the only way to get in there would have been to go back to the airport. Things were not all bad and the experience was unique at least. The hotel was right beside Palm Oil farms, and so felt as if it was the hangout point for local workers. There featured a selection of independent fast food stalls as well as a KFC and Pizza hut, and the men and boys sat around smoking, drinking tea and watching TV movies, projected ohto screens surrounding the area like a drive in movie. I hung out with these people for a bit, wandered the grounds of the area that surrounded the hotel, tried a little bit of Malaysian KFC featuring a soy style seasoning before giving up on my adventures for the night and heading to sleep. Just after destroying my cockroach friend from before.

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My hotel choice, while interesting, was probably not the complete Kuala Lumpur experience, so the next day, against the advice of an Australian engineer I met at the hotel I headed off to the airport to catch a train to town. At this stage I had also lost one of Debit cards (thankfully I have both a Visa and a Mastercard), so spent the first hour of the day trying to call Westpac at the airport to cancel that card. Turns out you can cancel these cards online, which I preceded to do using the Airport Wifi, and after storing my bags at the airport for a reasonable 60 MYR, I found my way to the city train-line and headed off towards KL Sentral. KL Sentral is the main train meeting up in Kuala Lumpur and from there I was to catch another train, of which the last stop was the Batu Caves. I knew not much about these Caves, except that they are a Hindu sacred place of some sort, and that they were commonly rated a top place to visit in KL on the usual lists. Seemed like a good enough mission for my one day in the Malaysian Metropolis.

It was easier and faster than expected to train out to the Batu Caves, and on the way I met a Canadian couple who had been traveling South East Asia and seemed to know more about what the caves were than me. I followed them off the last train stop and found the Caves to be right there. The rumour that Monkeys were roaming freely around the Batu caves area was true, to my delight, and the next two hours were taken up taken videos and photos of nearly every Monkey I saw. They were quite the characters, ruthlessly stealing tourists’ bags if in reaching distance, mostly looking for food however and uninterested in material possessions

Leading up to the caves were a steep set of steps and a giant gold Hindu statue. The Australian man’s claim from earlier that the steps would take half an hour to climb were also untrue, but were quite an impressive and spectacular experience. Inside the caves were sacred Hindu worshiping areas, that I mostly avoided, although earlier I had walked through a scared area wearing shoes – a Taboo. Not intentionally a disrespectful traveler, but it happens.

Before leaving the Caves I took time to visit a dark area, which are a conservation area stripped of the lights, monkeys and statues that inhabit the other caves. The donation given to enter these caves goes directly into supporting the conservation of these caves, and inside a tour guide took us through areas containing massive stalactites, spiders, rare a-sexual worms and the highlight for me – bats. Although the bats were fairly hard to see, one or two swooped by which was thrilling in of itself.

Now just past midday, tired but feeling accomplished in my tourist adventures, I ate a nice vegetarian curry from a restaurant just beside the caves and then headed back to town. I meet a new friend on the way, a man from Uruguay who had also just arrived in KL after traveling Asia for months. We shared stories and then departed, after exchanging Facebook details of course. I still had a few hours left before I had to check in for my next flight, so in one last tourist quest, took another train-line to KLCC (Kuala Lumpur City Central perhaps?) in order to see a bit man made structure, the Petronas towers. They are indeed large towers but I couldn’t figure out how to get to the sky walk. Having experienced such things at the Skytower viewing point in Auckland I instead opted to pay 2 MYR to use a fancy toilet that came complete with a selection of perfumes. Smelling better I then wandered Kuala Lumpur streets for a little bit, taking a few more photos, shooting a few more music video shots in front of the towers (video to come) before finally deciding it was time to take my exhausted self back to the airport.

After a low amount of sleep the night before, and the adventures of that day in the fairly hot South East Asian climate, I was pretty much ready to crash by the time I had gotten to the airport. I struggled my way through check-in and a few more security checks, nearly had a breakdown as I couldn’t figure out where to buy a travel pillow amongst the huge amounts of Duty Free stores and then finally made my way to the gate where I collapsed in a fatigued but accomplished state. My first Asian experience was a good one, and just seeing new trees, animals, communities and types of food was a massive thrill. I’d chosen Kuala Lumpur on a whim, because it was a cheaper Asian stop-over than many, and because I’d once had a random dream about stopping over in a large unknown Asian country. It turned out worthwhile, if just as disorganized as I would expect. Next I will tell you of my four hour Dubai stop-over rampage (that took place a mere six hours after leaving KL) and of my introduction to London.

Hamish, shutting up for now.

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A Season Of Firsts part III: First Stop Melbourne

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The ‘A Season Of Firsts’ series of blogs is me accounting my fairly un-unique O.E. (overseas experience) of relocating from New Zealand to the United Kingdom to work and travel. I’m now several weeks into living in London, but I’m only just publishing blogs from a few weeks back. More up to date blogs to come soon, as well as general culture articles.

My adventure has begun. Surviving so far.

I’ve survived the four hour journey away from Auckland to Melbourne, made it through a new foreign city environment and managed to communicate successfully with the locals. Which is proven to be as you’d probably assume, not that difficult, given New Zealanders are kind of like slightly quieter, more insecure versions of Australians. One of the most interesting things I’ve learnt so far, is that the Aussie-Kiwi cultural competition exists more in the minds of New Zealanders than it does Aussies. Australians are too busy beating the world at most sports (or at least India, in their two biggest sports, Hockey and Cricket) and enjoying their far stronger economy. New Zealanders are far more aware than Australians of the cultural items they’ve had to share claim of with their neighbors. While I’m yet to totally shake these cultural insecurities, it’s nice to be given a sober, objective perspective on New Zealand’s place in the world and how we relate to our neighbors, and it perhaps was aptly only once I escaped my home country that I was able to take on board these perspectives.

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Mostly though, I’ve been goofing around with friends and enjoying the size and prettiness of Melbourne. The city makes it easy to get around. There are trams everywhere, as well as buses and trains and there’s a bike share initiative apparently not unlike the ‘Boris’ bikes in London. You can hire a bike from numerous bike share depot points for about $3 for half an hour, with plenty of bike points scattered around the city at which to drop the bike off at. I got distracted and stuck with my bike for over 2 hours, which probably pinged me over $30, but seemed worth it for the uninhibited trip around the city.

Adjusting to the time difference has so far been relatively painless, although four hours in the past is admittedly not a huge time difference. I feel good I’m doing this in stages; heading to KL next, even for a day will break it up more. I still feel tired like it’s one in the morning, but with an added two hours to my day. I shudder to think how I’ll react to the London time difference, though we shall soon see.

A few notes, my Kathmandu 70l bag is on the uncomfortably heavy side and is a mission to put on at 22kgs. Might be time to do some clothes dumping, although I’m not ready to part with much of the clothes yet. Staying with a friend has bee a life saver, and seems to be a good way to go rather than a backpackers, if you can wrangle it well and be a considerate guest. You’ll know if you’re not wanted (or at least I think so).

City one of the big trip over and nearly done, just about on to bigger and more ambitious quests. Which reminds me, I’ve not made any progress towards finding work in my eventual stop London. So perhaps I should pause buying thousand dollar cameras and get back to what’s really important. At least my Glastonbury bootlegs will be mean.

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A Season of Firsts part II: Final Bout of Hesitancy

Leaving home ain’t easy, Queen knew it all too well (Brian May to be precise).

Great song, and the message is true. By now some of you all ready know I’m departing my usual New Zealand soils and heading over seas in a trip much shorter than that taken by our colonialist ancestors. Six months in a leaky boat it is not, instead it will be our much taken for granted, 20 hours in an air-conditioned airplane.

While I’m very excited about my upcoming adventures, just this week I have been experiencing pangs of indecision and possible regret. This is probably to be expected with any large personal undertaking. When I pulled the trigger to head overseas on this working adventure, I most definitely my heart was only about 80% into the idea. But it had been sitting in my head for so long; festering, stewing – that eventually something had to be done. Once the trigger was pulled there was no turning back .Through the inevitable regrets and doubts I must trek, to blunder forward as confidently as I possibly can; meanwhile being shit scared about turning my back on a good job, the safety net of family and of familiarity.

As I move forward, not yet having left, I have to say that already positive things seem to be happening. I’ve gained a lot more momentum, something I’d been searching for for some time. Momentum is crucial to getting creative projects done and I guess the relief of not having to spend nights worrying about what I’ll do has freed me to up to be thinking more creatively. Working on this blog is one such example.

But then I think of how I no longer have an income. Of how I have to go back to working tough jobs for long hours, or maybe not working at all. I have no idea where I’m going to live, and I have no idea of the city I’m about to enter.

This all might be quite melodramatic overseas experiences to the UK have been done time and time again by New Zealanders. I guess that doesn’t make it any easier for this Kiwi however.

Here’s the final self portrait photograph (or selfie) taken by myself, before I departed Southern Hemisphere land (taking in Kuala Lumpur International Airport, exhausted and un-showered. More on Malaysia to come)

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Indecisive Travels

I’ve been writing blogs now for a few weeks, but have been storing them up, due (cough) indecision over what to do with. Out of necessity, I have to pull the trigger, so I’m going through with having not one, but an excessive TWO blogs. My main blog – http://www.shutuphamish.com – will remain and will be the hub for both my culture writing and travel writing (I will reblog from here to there, the culture writing won’t appear here). The reasons for this are that I somewhere deep down inside feel that I need a specific place for my travel writing, even more specific then a category page on shut up hamish. So here we are, Indecisive Travels is born, and it shall be for the next few months as well. I’ve got some good stuff building up on life in London, because man it’s full of some ups and…

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A Season Of Firsts: Losing My Overseas Virginity

I’m now in the middle of travelling to London, and am currently editing this blog from a train in Kuala Lumpur. I should be making the most of being in a foreign place but I wanted to post this while it’s still relevant to my current travels. There will be more travel posts to come, either here or on a new site that I will link up.

At 25, I’ve experienced a fair amount of life. I’ve done the preschool years, the wild innocence of my childhood. I’ve done the confusing and expectantly traumatic period of puberty and early teens. I’ve graduated high school, graduated University, had a few proper adult jobs and lived independently for some time.

I’ve achieved many things I’d dreamed of achieving but had not been so arrogant to have assumed them a certainty. Things such as learning an instrument, learning multiple instruments, playing concerts, touring, releasing CDs, having reunions, finishing dissertations, filming music videos and releasing mildly successful local music videos – successful enough in their political critique to gain the attention of the electoral commission. I’ve made friends, lost friends, gained friends again. Had girlfriends, lost girlfriends, become friends with them in time. I’ve had many great times with family and am lucky enough to still have most of my family alive and well. So I can already look back on my quarter century and feel gratitude, and satisfaction at how things have turned out.

But still, there are many firsts I am yet to experience. Over the next few weeks I will be ticking a great many of these firsts off my bucket list. It will be first time outside of Australasia, my first time on a long haul flight, my first time traveling internationally solo, and my first time crossing hemispheres. I’ve never been to Asia before, but I will achieve this with a day long stop over in Kuala Lumpur – hopefully enough to see the Batu Caves and perhaps some monkeys roaming free around them. I’ve never been the Middle East before, but a five hour stop over in Dubai will provide a brief experience of this. I’ve never had to sleep overnight on a plane, and never really crossed time barriers, so therefor I’ve never experienced jet leg. All of this is to come.

Travel is a relatively common thing for some families so this may not seem a big deal. But my family are not great travelers, my Mum, Grandma and Grandfather only got as far as Australia. My Dad’s made it to Asia and many Pacific Islands. Only an Uncle of mine had previously ventured off to do the living in England thing. So for me, it seems a massive deal, and I’m kind of surprised I’ve even gotten to this stage where I’m about to pull it off. The fact I’ve done so little like this in the past, except for moving from Dunedin to Auckland, makes it all the more thrilling and nerve wracking (although to be honest I’m relatively calm at the moment).

The experience of moving across to the United Kingdom and working there is in many ways part of the New Zealand cultural identity. We our a colony of the British Empire after all, with a great deal of us descended from British, Scottish and Irish immigrants, and the influence of England has of course spread into the many other cultures that now make up our multicultural Islands. We used to view the UK as home, as my Grandma was telling me just yesterday, as she reminisced about her childhood. In this way, I like to think that I am venturing back to our recent ancestral home, so good or bad, it will be incredibly valuable cultural education.

This is of course the biggest first, losing my living overseas virginity. I’m sure it’ll come with it’s own crazy highs and depressing lows, homesickness, work struggles and such – but it will surely give me an experience at following my own heart and taking some risks. Plus I’m also breaking my camping festival virginity – and this happens to be for Glastonbury 2015. So the hedonistic partying highlights are there already.

I will attempt with this blog to give you a rundown on how everything goes. You’ll soon here about how I go attempting to fly Jetstar, Royal Brunei and Emirates with stop-overs in Melbourne, Brunei, Kuala Lumpur and Dubai. Will I make the flights? Will my luggage come with me? You’ll soon here about Glastonbury and whether it lived up to the hype. Who were the best artists? Is it really the best festival on earth? Did my tent survive the rain and mud? I’ll also write on life in London, the steps I take to get set up and how a Kiwi with little world experience finds life in the big English metropolis.

I’m not entirely sure if I am following that most metaphorical of organs in my upper chest, or if I’m running to the other side of the world out of fear, of something like commitment for example. My heart most definitely lies with my family and friends in New Zealand and I will make as much effort to stay in contact with them as possible. Right now, having resign from my job and taking steps towards this most anticipated adventure, it feels good. Surely if something feels good, that’s a good indicator that you’re on the right track.

Peace out, more from me soon.

Oh and here’s a drawing of me by my good friend, the great Shanghai artist, Ultraman Zhong Wen Chen.

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